SIDEBAR

Our growing taste for shrimp is bad news for climate change

shrimpboat
Split Second Stock/shutterstock.com By Erik Stokstad Apr. 2, 2018 , 1:25 PM Fishing boats are catching more shrimp and lobsters than ever before—and although that may be good news for your next visit to a seafood restaurant, it’s not so hot for climate change. The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by fishing vessels rose 28% from 1990 to 2011, according to a new study, thanks largely to a greater haul of this premium seafood. The findings are especially alarming because, over the past 2 decades, some fishing boats have become more fuel efficient and buyouts of excess fishing vessels have decreased competition and distances traveled. But the additional emissions from shrimp and lobster fishing have outweighed those gains. Pulling nets through the water adds considerable drag and also requires lower speeds, both factors that drain fuel tanks quickly. Lobster fishing also takes a lot of diesel to place, check,...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© SCIENCEMAG.ORG

121 Hits
0 Comment

The Ocean Has Released an Insane Amount of CO2, And No One Even Noticed

seagrass-01_1024
Our planet's climate is built on a whole host of interlinked chemical reactions and counter-reactions, and we just learned about another: an underwater heatwave has triggered a worryingly huge release of CO2 from Amphibolis antarctica seagrass off north-western Australia.   Vast tracts of these flowering marine plants were killed by the stress of living in waters that were 2-4 degrees Celsius (3.6-7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than normal back in the summer of 2010-2011, researchers have found. More than a third of the seagrass meadows were potentially affected. And no one really noticed. And the findings have very real implications for the kind of self-perpetuating heat rises we could be in for, say the international team of researchers, as too much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere warms the planet and leads to the release of even more greenhouse gases. (Paul Lavery) Losing seagrass is a double whammy for our environment's health...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

252 Hits
0 Comment

‘Fishpeople’ tells stories of lives affected by the sea

‘Fishpeople’ tells stories of lives affected by the sea
A new documentary by Santa Barbara filmmaker Keith Malloy, tells the stories of six people who have dedicated their lives to the ocean in different ways. Among them are a spear fisherman in Hawaii, a former coal miner in Australia and a youth worker in San Francisco. Presented by Ventura-based outdoor retailer Patagonia, “Fishpeople,” screens at Patagonia headquarters on Thursday, April 20th and in Santa Barbara at the Sandbox on Friday, April 21st . KCRW’s Jonathan Bastian spoke with Malloy about why he chose to make this film. Clockwise from top left: Dave Rastovich (surfer), Kimi Werner (spearfisher), Matahi Drollet (surfer/fisherman), Lynne Cox (open-water swimmer), Eddie Donnellan (youth worker), Ray Collins (photographer). KCRW: You and your brothers are surfers as well as filmmakers. You could have made a surf film. Why go this route? Keith Malloy: The ocean has affected me in such a positive way, and part of it’s surfing...
Continue reading
Tags:
0

Copyright

© #Flipboard - TheOceanRoamer

1174 Hits
0 Comment

MY ACCOUNT


WE RECOMMEND

DAN EUROPE OFFICIAL PARTNER

OCEANROAMERS recommends using DAN as your diving insurance and first aid education resource.
Contact us now for health, and diving insurances.



Daily Updates

From Facebook and Linkedin

OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Plastic is one of the most enduring materials we make; it takes an estimated 500 to 1,000 years for it to #degrade, but 50 percent of the plastic we produce is used once and then thrown away. Eight million tons of plastic ends up in the #ocean every year. #oceandebris #plasticpollution #sustainability #goblu3 Facts like this are plentiful, but you get the idea. So, a call to arms. Here are some very easy things to give up in order to curb your contribution to the problem.
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Scubadivers may be more aware of the threats facing #sharks — but we also feel helpless about what we can do. It’s a sobering statistic: Up to 25 percent of the world’s sharks and rays are threatened with #extinction, according to the #IUCN #SharkSpecialistGroup (SSG). Using the #IUCNRedList of #ThreatenedSpecies criteria, the SSG says that of the 1,041 species assessed, 107 rays and 74 sharks are classified as threatened.