oceanroamers

Providing management & consulting services to the marine, diving and tourism industries since 2003.

Environmentalists, scientists from the 1960s return to fight for Great Barrier Reef

Posted October 15, 2017 11:21:21   Photo: Fish and coral at Ellison Reef on Queensland's Great Barrier Reef. (Supplied: Australian Institute of Marine Science) It is half a century since marine researcher Eddie Hegerl first dived on Ellison Reef on the Great Barrier Reef off Mission Beach in north Queensland. He was a penniless 22-year-old researcher when he joined a tiny grassroots group in their battle to save the reef from certain destruction. "We were optimistic," he said. But the odds were stacked heavily against them. Although now a treasured World Heritage Area and marine park, 50 years ago the Great Barrier Reef was targeted for mining. Reef campaign begins   Photo: Eddie Hegerl (left) and John Busst (centre) campaigning in 1968 in Innisfail. (Supplied: Friends of Ninney Rise) In 1967, artist and Mission Beach resident John Busst found an ad in the local paper for an application to mine...
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The Lisbon Maru, sunken World War II ship

By Emily Kent Smith - Daily Mail The remains of a ship in which more than 820 British prisoners of war drowned at sea after being locked inside by Japanese guards is believed to have been found decades after the tragedy. Now, 75 years after one of the most shocking crimes committed during the Second World War, a debate over whether the ship’s wreckage should be recovered has been sparked by the only living British man who survived the atrocity. The Lisbon Maru had some 1,800 captured British soldiers on board when it sunk in the East China Sea in September 1942 after being hit by an American torpedo. As the 7,000 ton boat started to take on water, Japanese guards battened down the hatches with planks and tarpaulin to try and drown those stranded aboard and leaving many unable to escape. Of those who made it off the ship,...
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Shipwreck of heroic British explorer Ben Leigh Smith

From The Siberian Times   The name of Benjamin (Ben) Leigh Smith may not seem too familiar among Arctic explorers, but it should be. The intrepid explorer born into a radical English family named the cape where his vessel sank after being trapped between two giant icebergs after his famous relative Florence Nightingale, known as 'The Lady with the Lamp' for tending the wounded in the Crimean War, an English social reformer and statistician who is seen in her country as the founder of modern nursing.  On his fateful voyage which culminated in the fateful sinking of his elegant steam yacht, the Eira, a remarkable photograph records a meeting at sea with two other ships from Peterhead in Scotland, the Hope and the Eclipse. Leigh Smith invited on board the Eira the captains of both these ships and an historic picture records the occasion.  After the Eira sank, the crew...
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The Ancient underwater city Heracleion - Abu Kir / Egypt

The city dates back to the 6th century B.C. and holds some of the most beautiful artifacts you could imagine. Things like grand statues of gods and goddesses standing well over 15 feet tall and carved out of red granite, treasures of gold and rare stones, elaborate temples and enormous tablets. This find is enormous in the historical preservation community and has been commissioned by museums around the world. This is an absolutely epic underwater find that has researchers scrambling to this part of the globe to learn about this incredibly beautiful Egyptian city. The fact that this city found underwater has been left untouched underwater for so many years is an amazing factor on its own let alone being a find as big as it truly is. These statues and artifacts are massive and nearly perfectly preserved. The attention to detail in these pieces is truly beautiful and I’m happy to...
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The Black Sea Shipwrecks graveyard - special video report

 ​ A shipwreck lover's dream has been discovered in the azure waters of the Black Sea: around 60 wrecks, from the Byzantine era to the 19th century, revealing 2,500 years of maritime history. Described as a "ship graveyard" due to the sheer numbers, the plethora of ships found is not only incredible but some of them are in astonishingly good shape too. The three-year project, Black Sea MAP , from the University of Southampton's Centre for Maritime Archeology and funded by the EEF, is one of the largest marine archeological projects ever staged, and to begin with it wasn't even searching for ships. Researchers set out to complete geophysical surveys of the Black Sea to study the effects of climate change and how it had changed the environment along the Bulgarian coast. However, they found a whole lot more in this submerged world. Photogrammetric model of a shipwreck from the...
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15 March 2017
I can just see Cousteau the father of diving turning in the grave. After the disastrous management of the Calypso by the late captain's last wife, now the last bastion of Cousteau's legacy Aqualung ha...
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After the 20th shark attack off Reunion Island since 2011 occurred earlier this week, the world’s greatest surfer made a comment that “there needs to be a serious cull on Reunion and it should happen...
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A Red Sea diving liveaboard had to be evacuated on Saturday, 13 May after what appeared to be a galley fire broke out. According to one of the 23 guests, who were left with few possessions between th...
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PADI CEO Releases Statement on New Owners Story brought to you by DIVEMAGAZINE The Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) was sold in March this year to a private consortium known only a...
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19 May 2017
We take a look at the best diving movies of all time, from thrilling underwater epics to Hollywood blockbusters featuring incredible subaquatic scenes. The underwater realm struggles t...
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12 April 2017
March 15, 2017 at 9:19 PM Researchers have created a new model for predicting decompression sickness after deep-sea dives that not only estimates the risk, but how severe the symptoms are likely to b...
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