Madagascar: No more fish? We'll farm seaweed instead

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Landing his wooden canoe on the coral-sand coast of Madagascar, just a few steps from his home, fisherman Samba Lahy recalls his childhood: "I started fishing with my parents when I was 18," he told DW. "We used to return home with the pirogue packed with fish." Today, life in Tampolove - a small village in the south of Madagascar - has changed for Lahy and his family. "Resources are rare," he said. For 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of fish per day, fisherman can earn $1 (.87 euros). "On lucky days, a catch goes up to 20 kilograms," Lahy explained. Fishermen have seen fish stocks dwindle over the course of their lifetimes Fish stocks around the world are being put at risk by climate change, overexploitation, pollution and habitat destruction . In Madagascar, this is particularly worrying, as fishing contributes more than 7 percent of the national gross domestic product - and is the backbone of the...
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'First hint' of a puzzling change in Southern Ocean revealed by CSIRO

Researchers aboard an Australian ship undertaking pioneering work in the Southern Ocean have found the "first hint" of a shift in a decades-long trend towards fresher, less dense water off Antarctica. Teams of scientists on the RV Investigator have been profiling the salinity and temperature of water between Tasmania and Antarctica at 108 locations. Dr Steve Rintoul, chief scientist of the RV Investigator voyage, with one of the deep-sea floats. Photo: Peter Mathew They also released the first batch of deep Argot floats to measure conditions as deep as 4000 metres. But it is the early analysis of data on salinity in the so-called bottom waters near the seabed that may stir international debate. "Every time we've measured since the 1970s, [bottom water's] been becoming lighter and fresher," Steve Rintoul, the voyage chief scientist, told Fairfax Media on Monday as the ship took its final ocean profile. "We’ve got the first hint...
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New desalination technology turns the world’s oceans into unlimited lithium mine (+drinking water)

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You know that argument that comes up when someone sees your electric car and says something like, “it is way worse to mine lithium needed for batteries than oil and what happens when the lithium runs out? I saw a Meme on the internet  so I know it is true.”  Well… Fun fact: The earth’s ocean water is full of lithium salts and getting at it will simply be a byproduct of desalinating drinking water from seawater. This process is growing by leaps and bounds, especially as climate change is putting cities like Capetown in water crisis . Sure there are downsides to desalination like scooping up marine life and the incredible energy it takes to produce fresh water as well as what to do with the byproducts. But these are solvable problems, especially as freshwater is dumped into our oceans from the melting ice caps. New technologies like metal-organic frameworks...
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Miami could be underwater in your kid’s lifetime as sea level rise accelerates

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Disputing the ice caps are melting, President Trump insists they're at a record level. He's right they're at a record, a record low. Nathan Rousseau Smith (@FantasticMrNate) explains. Buzz60 The Totten Glacier is the most rapidly thinning glacier in East Antarctica. (Photo: Australian Antarctic Division, AFP/Getty Images) Sea-level rise is accelerating around the world, thanks to ongoing melting of ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland, a new study suggests. At the current rate of melting, the world's seas will be at least 2 feet higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Such a rise could leave portions of the world’s coastal cities underwater. It would also increase high tides and worsen storm surges. "This acceleration ... has the potential to double the total sea level rise by 2100 as compared to projections that assume...
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OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
Feast your eyes on this amazing #underwater #video. "Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. #slowlife #corals #slowmotion #reef #theoceanroamer