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"...The Go Blue Initiative is not just about mindless protection, writing laws and never ending complaints about governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

The Go Blue initiative is about LEARNING - DISCOVERING - PROTECTING TOGETHER, not just in words but in deeds." - THEOCEANROAMER 2017

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BLU3 GOUNA presentation with the Rotary Club Red Sea

Miami could be underwater in your kid’s lifetime as sea level rise accelerates

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Disputing the ice caps are melting, President Trump insists they're at a record level. He's right they're at a record, a record low. Nathan Rousseau Smith (@FantasticMrNate) explains. Buzz60 The Totten Glacier is the most rapidly thinning glacier in East Antarctica. (Photo: Australian Antarctic Division, AFP/Getty Images) Sea-level rise is accelerating around the world, thanks to ongoing melting of ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland, a new study suggests. At the current rate of melting, the world's seas will be at least 2 feet higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Such a rise could leave portions of the world’s coastal cities underwater. It would also increase high tides and worsen storm surges. "This acceleration ... has the potential to double the total sea level rise by 2100 as compared to projections that assume...
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25 Years of Satellite Data Uncover Alarming Error in Sea Level Measurements

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T he Earth is changing in ways that could cause an actual mass extinction during our lifetimes. In recent years, scientists have made it abundantly clear that humans are driving climate change , but what they’ve only recently found out is how quickly we’re making the Earth more inhospitable. In a new study published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they report that the rate at which the climate getting worse is actually increasing each year. In the paper , a team of climate researchers shows evidence that global sea levels are rising at an accelerating rate. Scientists previously thought that sea level rise was constant at 3 millimeters per year or even slowing, but this new study, first-authored by R. Steven Nerem , associate director of the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, shows that the annual global average sea level rise has increased by about 0.08...
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Ozone layer continues to thin over Earth's populated areas

The ozone hole reached its largest size of the year on Oct. 2, 2015. (Photo: NASA) The ozone layer that protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation continues to thin over populated areas of the world, a new study warns. Scientists say the layer is in better shape, however, over the North and South Poles. Ozone has been declining globally since the 1980s. While the banning of the chloroflourocarbons that cause the thinning is leading to a recovery at the poles, "the same does not appear to be true for the lower latitudes," study author Joanna Haigh of Imperial College in London said. Located in the stratosphere, the ozone layer blocks potentially harmful ultraviolet energy from reaching our planet's surface. Without it, humans and animals could experience increased rates of skin cancer and other ailments.  Scientists first discovered the dramatic thinning in Earth's protective sheet in the 1970s and determined the production...
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Earth's Greatest Extinction Event May Have Been Caused by Thinning Ozone

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T he end-Permian extinction, also known as the Permian-Triassic extinction, is one of the greatest mysteries in the Earth’s entire history. Sure, the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event, the one that (almost) wiped out all the dinosaurs , was bad, but it pales in comparison to the end-Permian extinction event . This mass extinction event, which began about 251.9 million years ago, wiped out over 90 percent of marine species and more than two-thirds of terrestrial species in about 500 thousand years. But aside from the theory that a massive volcanic eruption probably set this extinction event in motion, scientists don’t have a totally clear idea of what really happened on Earth during this event. Some tiny grains of evidence could change that, though. In a paper published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, researchers from the Department of Integrative Biology and Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley, provide...
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11 reasons to avoid supermarket seafood

Supermarkets may be convenient, but they just aren't the best place to shop for meat . And they may not be the best place to purchase seafood, either. Buy it from a reputable fishmonger if possible. If you don't live near a fishmonger, however, the supermarket seafood is probably safe. 11 Reasons to Avoid Supermarket Seafood Gallery We simply want to raise your awareness of a few factors that might influence your buying choices. We understand if you have no other option than to buy your fish at the supermarket; not everyone lives a short distance from a full-on fish market with knowledgeable fishmongers at the ready. The best consumer is an educated one, and when it comes to seafood, it pays to be educated. Do some research into the fish you're buying, and make your decisions based on what's sustainable, how it's caught or farmed, where it's from, and...
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The way the world catches fish defies all economic logic

It’s often said that there are plenty more fish in the sea. For most of human history, that was true. From ancient Minoans to postwar industrial trawl fleets, mankind found wealth from harvesting more and more of the sea’s seemingly endless abundance of creatures. The more fishermen tried, the more their catches grew, such that, between 1950 and the mid-1990s, global fish landings more than quintupled. And then, suddenly, that stopped. Since then, the world has hauled up roughly the same volume of fish out of the ocean each year—about 85 million tonnes, on average. It’s not hard to guess the culprit: overfishing. Similarly well-known is that overfishing is a problem of biology: we’re hauling up too many fish, leaving too few adult ones behind to repopulate. But if fewer and fewer fish are left behind to replace themselves, why have we caught around the same volume of them each...
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7 Facts about Green Sea Turtles

Beloved by scuba divers, green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) are both alike and different from other sea turtle species. 1. Green sea turtles aren't named for the color of their shells or carapaces; they're named for the greenish hue of their skin. Their shells are normally brown, dark olive, gray or black, depending on their habitat. Their shells are smooth and heart-shaped. The underside of the shell, called the plastron, is a yellowish-white color. 2. There are two types of green turtles — scientists debate whether they are subspecies or separate species — the Atlantic green turtle, generally found off the coasts of Europe and North America, and the Eastern Pacific green turtle, which lives in coastal waters from Alaska to Chile. 3. Green sea turtles can grow to 3 or 4 feet in length and can weigh up to 700 pounds — a little heavier than an average-sized vending...
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How Jellyfish Break Down Oil After a Spill

Jellyfish produce mucus, especially when stressed, which can interact with oil and break it down. This moon jellyfish is sloughing off mucus that has mixed with droplets of oil. By Emily Frost Jellyfish aren't the passive creatures you think they are. While they appear to simply drift through the ocean, letting the currents take them where they may, they can also swim up and down in the water column. With weak muscles , they squeeze their bells to eject trapped water, which propels them forward. When they unclench those muscles, the bells refill with water and give them a second boost. It's a slow way to travel, but uses little energy, making jellyfish the most energy-efficient swimmers in the sea . The tiny movements from the jellies produce small underwater waves and currents that can move quite large volumes of water . It's possible that the small turbulence created by...
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Jesse Zeman: Why hunters and anglers work to protect our natural capital

British Columbians purchase approximately 280,000 freshwater angling licences, 110,000 hunting licences, and 280,000 saltwater angling licences annually. Elaine Thompson / AP In a Jan. 29 article, “Hunting culture rife within ministry”, it was inferred that the B.C. Conservation Officer Service is over-represented by hunters and that conservation officers choose their career for reasons inconsistent with protecting and conserving B.C.’s natural capital. The focus on personal, instead of policy-based issues, also attacked not only the interests and motivations of conservation officers, but those of hunters and anglers. The following response addresses what hunters and anglers do, and why. British Columbians purchase approximately 280,000 freshwater angling licences, 110,000 hunting licences, and 280,000 saltwater angling licences annually. If you haven’t tried hunting or fishing, chances are you know someone who does. In B.C., hunting and angling bring in nearly $1 billion annually to our economy. A prerequisite to being a hunter or angler is...
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Coral-killing chemical still appears in many sunscreen formulas

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Coral reefs the world over are increasingly under threat. Scientists say rising sea temperatures, ocean acidification, and even a chemical commonly found in sunscreen are contributing to the decline in reef health. How are our reefs holding up? An abundance of sunshine draws vacationers to Cayman’s shores like moths to a flame, and to protect themselves from the sweltering Cayman sun. Many slather themselves with a product that could contain a chemical proven deadly to corals – oxybenzone. “If it does have oxybenzone, then it is confirmed to have an impact on the coral reef creatures, and yeah, literally it does kill them at very very low levels,” said DOE Deputy Director Tim Austin. He said research published almost a decade ago first identified oxybenzone as a coral killer. “The awareness that has come up as a result of the scientific research has sunk in to the industry, a lot of...
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SOCIAL

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5 biggest #threats to our #oceans - and what we can do about them #oceanprotection
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#Marine #Etiquette ever heard of it? Here a friendly reminder Knowing how to #interact with #ocean #wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk.Knowing how to interact with ocean wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk. #THEOCEANROAMER #NOOA
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Madagascar: No more fish? We'll farm seaweed instead The changing #climate is a major pressure on communities across Madagascar #nofish #climatechange Add to the equation that coastal communities like Tampolove are experiencing changing weather patterns. "We are well into the rainy season, but have yet to receive rain," said Richard Badouraly, president of the aquaculture community in Tampolove. "Both farmers and fishers are in trouble."
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
Way to go scottie! Scotland plans to #ban #plasticstraws by end of 2019