oceanroamers

Providing management & consulting services to the marine, diving and tourism industries since 2003.
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"...The Go Blue Initiative is not just about mindless protection, writing laws and never ending complaints about governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

The Go Blue initiative is about LEARNING - DISCOVERING - PROTECTING TOGETHER, not just in words but in deeds." - THEOCEANROAMER 2017

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BLU3 GOUNA presentation with the Rotary Club Red Sea

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Environmental News

WATCH: Large Humpback Whale Trapped In California's Ventura Harbor, Rescuers Use Hydrophones To Guide It

Rescue crews and biologists were seen using underwater microphones, known as hydrophones to guide get a large humpback whale back to the ocean after it got stuck in the Ventura Harbor Marina in California on Saturday afternoon. The rare spectacle of an almost 40-foot-long whale swimming in circles between docks at the Ventura Harbor Marina attracted a large audience and television cameras, the Los Angeles Times reported. Read:  Most Polluted Animal On Earth: Dead Killer Whale Washes Up In Scotland The whale was said to have been trapped in the finger of the M dock between Ventura Isle Marina and Ventura West Marina. According to the authorities, the whale appeared to be angered as it swirled sand and dirt and muddied the water at the end of the dock. The humpback whale also hit the dock a few times and crashed into the rear end of a boat, almost hitting...
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A Second Major Coral Reef System Is Hit by Large-Scale Bleaching

A Second Major Coral Reef System Is Hit by Large-Scale Bleaching
The extensive coral reefs of the Chagos Archipelago, a collection of more than 60 small islands in the Indian Ocean, have been badly damaged by coral bleaching events over the past two years that have killed roughly 90 percent of the corals to a depth of 90 feet, according to a new survey. The widespread reef bleaching in the Chagos Archipelago, which contains the Diego Garcia military base used by U.S. and the U.K., comes on the heels of reports that coral bleaching driven by rising ocean temperatures has caused severe damage to roughly two-thirds of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. John Turner, a professor at Bangor University in Wales, told the Washington Post that back-to-back bleaching events in 2015 and 2016 had severely impacted reefs across the Chagos Archipelago. He said that a recent strong El Niño weather pattern had probably contributed to coral bleaching in the region, which even damaged corals...
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Global Warming Is Thawing Out Ancient Viruses And Bacteria Buried In Ice

Last summer in the Arctic circle, a 12-year-old boy died and many others were hospitalized  when they suddenly become infected with anthrax. The anthrax, scientists theorize, actually came from an infected reindeer that died in the region over 75 years ago and was frozen in permafrost, or frozen soil, until the permafrost melted in last summer's heat wave. When the ice melted, the anthrax diluted from the reindeer's body into the food and water supply, and began infecting the nearby reindeer herds, and eventually the people living nearby, too.  Related:  Soil: The Secret Weapon Against Climate Change With the rise of global warming, the possibility of diseases frozen in ice thawing out has become a potentially deadly reality. Many bacteria and viruses can survive in ice for millions of years, and we would not have a vaccine developed against them.  In their report in  Global Health Action , scientists Boris...
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Billionaire Gives Away His Fortune to Help Save the Ocean

Norwegian businessman Kjell Inge Røkke is not someone usually admired for environmental stewardship. Described by Forbes as a "ruthless corporate raider," Røkke made his billions as the majority stakeholder in shipping and offshore drilling conglomerate, Aker. The twist to this story? Røkke has decided to give " the lion's share " of his estimated $2.7 billion fortune towards building a 596-foot marine research vessel, the Research Expedition Vessel (REV), that's also designed to scoop up a major oceanic threat— plastic pollution . The REV, a collaboration with Norway's World Wildlife Fund (WWF), will be able to suck up to 5 tons of plastic a day from the waters and melt it down, Norway's Aftenposten newspaper reported. "I want to give back to society the bulk of what I've earned," Røkke told the publication. "This ship is a part of that." According to Business Insider , the mega-yacht—which will be the...
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Global Warming Frequently Asked Questions

Section 1: Changes + - What is global warming, and how is it different from climate change and climate variability? "Global warming" refers to an increase in Earth's annually averaged air temperature near the surface. Thermometer readings are collected from many thousands of weather stations around the world—over land and ocean—and then used to produce a global average temperature for each year. The resulting series of annual averages of global temperature from 1880 to 2012 show that Earth has warmed by 1.5°F (0.85°C).[ 1 ] Most of that warming has occurred since 1976. "Climate change" is a broadly inclusive term that refers to a long-term (decades to centuries) change in any of a number of environmental conditions for a given place and time—such as temperature, rainfall, humidity, cloudiness, wind and air circulation patterns, etc. These oscillations and other similar phenomena can influence weather and climate patterns around the globe. "Climate...
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Photographer waited in a river nightly for 4 years to get this singular shot of a beaver

Donning snorkeling gear and weights, Louis-Marie Preau would lie motionless on the riverbed for 2 to 3 hours a night waiting for the perfect photo. Suffice to say, photographers can be a bit obsessive. And wildly patient. Both of which are wonderfully, beautifully evident in this jaw-dropping photo of a Eurasian beaver fetching dinner in the Loire region of western France. WIth the unfortunate fate of having both fur and castoreum the subject of great lust for trappers, Eurasian beavers were nearly hunted to extinction by the middle of the 19th century. In France, the species (Castor fiber) was almost completely extinguished, save for a small population of about 100 individuals in the lower Rhone valley. Conservation efforts brought them back from the brink; France now plays home to more than 14,000 of them. They play an important role in the river ecosystem in France's Loire Valley. Having grown up...
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Tiny Zombie Worms Are the Beavers of the Deep

Tiny Zombie Worms Are the Beavers of the Deep | Hakai Magazine Menu Home Sections Topics Columns Original link

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Friendly Reminder: Starfish Selfies Are Also NOT OK

W e’ve already talked about how it’s a bad idea to take selfies with dolphins , sharks and seals . But apparently we need to get even more specific, because people are also taking starfish selfies.   So, one more time for the people in the back: Don’t take starfish selfies — or selfies with any wild animal whatsoever.   We don’t care if it’s an animal shaped like your favorite SpongeBob character.   For the love of Patrick, step away from the starfish.   Water You Waiting For? Sign up for Azula’s newsletter to bring the latest ocean news and crazy-cute animal videos straight to your inbox. Here’s what happened: A tourist in Thailand’s Hat Chao Mai National Park took a selfie with a starfish on her head and posted the photo to Facebook. sootin claimon on Twitter Trang guide fined Bt500 for tourist’s starfish selfie https://t.co/kA5HaP5H8d https://t.co/lKd7dvWTS6 https://t.co/KMM3rjVr4t  ...
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POPULAR

15 March 2017
I can just see Cousteau the father of diving turning in the grave. After the disastrous management of the Calypso by the late captain's last wife, now the last bastion of Cousteau's legacy Aqualung ha...
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After the 20th shark attack off Reunion Island since 2011 occurred earlier this week, the world’s greatest surfer made a comment that “there needs to be a serious cull on Reunion and it should happen...
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A Red Sea diving liveaboard had to be evacuated on Saturday, 13 May after what appeared to be a galley fire broke out. According to one of the 23 guests, who were left with few possessions between th...
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19 May 2017
PADI CEO Releases Statement on New Owners Story brought to you by DIVEMAGAZINE The Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) was sold in March this year to a private consortium known only a...
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We take a look at the best diving movies of all time, from thrilling underwater epics to Hollywood blockbusters featuring incredible subaquatic scenes. The underwater realm struggles t...
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12 April 2017
March 15, 2017 at 9:19 PM Researchers have created a new model for predicting decompression sickness after deep-sea dives that not only estimates the risk, but how severe the symptoms are likely to b...
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