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"...The Go Blue Initiative is not just about mindless protection, writing laws and never ending complaints about governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

The Go Blue initiative is about LEARNING - DISCOVERING - PROTECTING TOGETHER, not just in words but in deeds." - THEOCEANROAMER 2017

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BLU3 GOUNA presentation with the Rotary Club Red Sea

Alaska crushes record for hottest December as Arctic sea ice hits record low

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In its hottest December ever recorded, Alaska was a stunning 15.7°F above the 20th century average. And the year ended with Arctic sea ice hitting an all-time record low. While the East Coast had a cool December and New Year’s week, Alaska baked.  Last Tuesday, Anchorage hit 48°F , warmer than southern cities from Atlanta and Jacksonville to Houston and New Orleans. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  reported this week that Alaska averaged 19.4°F for the month, topping the previous record (1985) by a whopping 2.1°F. “That’s really quite astonishing,” said Rick Thoman, the National Weather Service’s climate sciences and services manager for the Alaska region. As he explained to the Anchorage Daily News , “ Usually you’re breaking those by a tenth of a degree or two-tenths of a degree.”  The Arctic as a whole was so warm in December that Arctic sea ice set a new end-of-year record...
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Rare Sharks With Bizarre Jaws Have Turned Up Off The Coast of Taiwan

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A recent catch in Taiwan is making waves: five rare and rarely seen viper dogfish - a type of small, luminescent and inky black shark that lives in the Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Hawaii, Japan and Taiwan.   The catch was made by the Taiwanese Fisheries Research Institute during a survey of fish species living off the coast of Taitung, according to local news reports . The viper dogfish, Trigonognathus kabeyai, are peculiar and distinctive-looking beasties, but not likely to harm humans. They live in deep waters, seem to have a small population and range, and are so elusive that they weren't even discovered until 1986 . Since then, they've shown up a few times over the decades, usually as fishing bycatch. Because they're so rarely seen, we don't know a lot about them, but scientists have been able to glean a fair amount from their taxonomy. Fisheries...
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These Insane Photos Show Alligators Stuck in Frozen Swamps Surviving The Winter

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Come in, the water's just fine! Okay, you won't be hearing any alligators saying that, but as these amazing images show, these restricted reptiles are taking the cold snap in their stride – even if their swampy home has transformed into a glittering prison of ice.   Like snorkelers who picked a particularly bad time to take a dip, these alligators at Shallotte River Swamp Park in North Carolina are trapped in frozen waters – and in these hostile, icy conditions, an ancient survival mechanism is kicking in. Ordinarily, these alligators would be spending their time sun-bathing or resting along the bottom of their swamp, but in a video captured by staff at the Swamp Park, we can see the animals adopting a very different pose on account of the punishing cold spell currently blasting the US . (Swamp Park/YouTube) What they're doing is called brumation , which is similar...
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Is fishing with electricity less destructive than digging up the seabed with beam trawlers?

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While many people may be interested in the sustainability and welfare of the fish they eat, or the health of the environment, fewer probably worry about the effect that trawl fishing – which accounts for 20% of landings – has on the ocean. For a long time researchers and the industry have been trying to improve trawl fishing practices. Things have moved on from practices such as beam trawling – where a large net is dragged across the ocean floor – to potentially less invasive and newer methods like electric pulse trawling. This sees electrical pulses being sent into the seawater to flush out bottom-dwelling fish like plaice and sole, causing them to swim into the path of trawl nets. Beam trawls have been the focus of environmental concern for decades, as it causes a substantial reduction in the abundance of animals living on the seabed. These effects can be...
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Great Barrier Reef: rising temperatures turning green sea turtles female

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Rising temperatures are turning almost all green sea turtles in a Great Barrier Reef population female, new research has found. The scientific paper warned the skewed ratio could threaten the population’s future. Sea turtles are among species with temperature dependent sex-determination and the proportion of female hatchlings increases when nests are in warmer sands. Tuesday’s paper, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, California State University and Worldwide Fund for Nature Australia, is published in Current Biology. It examined two genetically distinct populations of turtles on the reef, finding the northern group of about 200,000 animals was overwhelmingly female. While the southern population was 65%-69% female, females in the northern group accounted for 99.1% of juveniles, 99.8% of subadults and 86.8% of adults. “Combining our results with temperature data show that the northern GBR green turtle rookeries have been producing primarily females for more than two decades and that the...
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The Bottom of The Ocean Has Started Sinking Under The Weight of Melting Glaciers

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Decades of measurements and predictions of sea level rise could have underestimated the scale of the problem, experts warn, due to scientists not accounting for the weighty, warping effects of our ever burgeoning oceans. Existing assessments of sea level rise haven't factored in that as the total ocean mass increases due to melting glaciers and ice sheets, the weight of all that extra water pushes down on the sinking ocean floor, deforming the seabed – and disguising just how much the oceans are truly swelling. "The Earth itself is not a rigid sphere, it's a deforming ball," geoscientist Thomas Frederikse from the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands told Earther . "With climate change, we do not only change temperature." The implications, according to Frederikse and his team, is that as the ocean bottom subsides elastically, the actual increasing volume of the ocean – called barystatic sea level rise...
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The world's oceans are in even worse shape than we thought

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The Great Barrier Reef is in rough shape after multiple bleaching events. The Ocean Agency / XL Catlin Seaview Survey Two new studies show that the world's oceans are in dire straits — even more than scientists previously thought. One study found that coral bleaching events, which can kill reefs, are now happening every few years instead of every few decades. And a new review found that oceans are losing oxygen faster than we realized, which could have serious consequences for marine life. Ocean health has a huge impact on human health, so solving these problems is essential. Our world is an ocean planet. The seas support hundreds of millions of people by providing food and jobs around the globe. Ocean plants produce up to 85% of the oxygen in the air we breathe. But a pair of new studies published in the journal Science indicate that the oceans have...
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Global Warming’s Toll on Coral Reefs: As if They’re ‘Ravaged by War’

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In theory, coral reefs can recover from even a severe bleaching event. Some of the coral will die off from increased disease susceptibility, but once ocean temperatures drop again, many of the corals will start growing back. But that’s only if they’re given enough time. Typically, it takes 10 to 15 years for the fastest-growing corals to recover after a severe bleaching event. Larger corals that provide shelter for bigger fish can take even longer to grow back. As bleaching events become more frequent, reefs are unlikely to get that needed reprieve. Earth’s average temperature has increased 1 degree Celsius , or 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels, and the median time between severe bleaching events is now just six years, the Science study found. Case in point: The Scott Reef, 180 miles off the coast of Northwestern Australia, had over the past few years finally begun recovering from a...
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It is so cold in the United States right now that sharks are dying and turtles are cold-stunned

Updated December 30, 2017 18:21:02 Photo: This shark washed up on a snowy beach off Cape Cod Bay today. (Supplied: Atlantic White Shark Conservancy) Sharks are washing up on a beach in Massachusetts frozen completely solid amid a record-breaking cold snap in the United States. The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy said it had found three dead thresher sharks stranded on the shore of the Cape Cod Bay in Brewster, south of Boston, in the last three days. The first two were "likely stranded due to cold shock" it said. The third was frozen solid. Photo: The sharks were likely stranded while trying to reach warmer waters. (Supplied: Atlantic White Shark Conservancy) "This shark was too frozen to attempt a necropsy … a true sharkcicle," it said. Thresher sharks are found all over the world and generally stay far away from the shore, in warmer waters. "These sharks were most likely...
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Sunscreens that Protect You and the Ocean

Ah, summer. It’s that time of the year again for fun in the sun. When packing for your beach picnics, one of the most important items alongside the beer cooler is sunscreen. However, when you go to buy a sunscreen you are faced with the daunting prospect of choosing from hundreds of products lining your store’s shelves. What makes your purchase even more complicated is that you have been told that not all sunscreens are created equal, false labeling is rampant and often misleading.  So, what brands are safe for you and the kids and what should you know before making that very important purchase. (photo – Women’s Health) Fortunately, there are a number of resources to help guide you in making a purchase that insures you do not sizzle or slime the ocean.   Some Sun Suggestions Use shade, find it or make it with a beach umbrella and...
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SOCIAL

OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
5 biggest #threats to our #oceans - and what we can do about them #oceanprotection
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#Marine #Etiquette ever heard of it? Here a friendly reminder Knowing how to #interact with #ocean #wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk.Knowing how to interact with ocean wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk. #THEOCEANROAMER #NOOA
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Madagascar: No more fish? We'll farm seaweed instead The changing #climate is a major pressure on communities across Madagascar #nofish #climatechange Add to the equation that coastal communities like Tampolove are experiencing changing weather patterns. "We are well into the rainy season, but have yet to receive rain," said Richard Badouraly, president of the aquaculture community in Tampolove. "Both farmers and fishers are in trouble."
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
Way to go scottie! Scotland plans to #ban #plasticstraws by end of 2019