FEATURED STORIES

View my Flipboard Magazine.

"...The Go Blue Initiative is not just about mindless protection, writing laws and never ending complaints about governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

The Go Blue initiative is about LEARNING - DISCOVERING - PROTECTING TOGETHER, not just in words but in deeds." - THEOCEANROAMER 2017

More information on GO BLU3 INITIATIVES
View, support or donate to our various #GOBLU3 Projects in The Red Sea - Click Here.


BLU3 GOUNA presentation with the Rotary Club Red Sea

Our Choking Oceans

uyuyu
At several points in the earth’s past the oceans have given up their oxygen and borne witness to massive die-offs of marine creatures--extinction-level events--that forever changed the composition of marine life. These episodes of oxygen depletion seem to have been caused by molten magma being released into the seas, which belched massive quantities of iron into the ocean, prompting iron-loving algae to bloom in huge fields and robbing the seas of oxygen. Or, these eruptions sent carbon dioxide into the air, beginning a greenhouse effect that warmed seawater, reducing its ability to hold oxygen. Either way, when the ocean loses oxygen on a wide scale, it is very bad. And now, it’s happening again. Last week, an article in the journal Science showed that since about 1950, the zones of the world’s oceans that have lower-than-normal oxygen concentrations have increased dramatically in size. Big sections of the seas have such...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

54 Hits
0 Comment

Seismic Sea Sickness

Sean-Meets
Whales, are possibly the most irie animal on the planet. Gooi them some dreadlocks and you would be forgiven for mistaking these ocean wanderers as Bob Marley reincarnate, shit these homies even sing. You would also be forgiven for thinking that humans, despite a nation or two, leave these peaceful giants in peace. Well, sorry to burst your underwater bubble bru but your wrong! Familiar with a process called seismic surveying? Naught, didn’t think so! In a nutshell seismic surveying is a process used in ocean exploration to produce detailed images of local geology to source the location and size of possible oil and gas reservoirs. Sound waves are bounced off underground rock formations, and the waves that reflect back to the surface are captured by recording sensors for later analyses. So, what’s the big fuss? Well if you’re a whale, dolphin, turtle, cod, scallop or even plankton (not the oue...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

59 Hits
0 Comment

From greenhouse gases to plastics: New catalyst for recycling carbon dioxide discovered

The surface of a nanostructured copper catalyst that converts CO2 into ethylene. Credit: Canadian Light Source Imagine if we could take CO2, that most notorious of greenhouse gases, and convert it into something useful. Something like plastic, for example. The positive effects could be dramatic, both diverting CO2 from the atmosphere and reducing the need for fossil fuels to make products. A group of researchers, led by the University of Toronto Ted Sargent group, just published results that bring this possibility a lot closer. Using the Canadian Light Source and a new technique exclusive to the facility, they were able to pinpoint the conditions that convert CO2 to ethylene most efficiently. Ethylene, in turn, is used to make polyethylene—the most common plastic used today—whose annual global production is around 80 million tonnes. "This experiment could not have been performed anywhere else in the world, and we are thrilled with the...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

58 Hits
0 Comment

Scientific Study of Surfer Butts Reveal Drug-Resistant Bacteria in the Oceans

0c72fd0500dd
S urfers are known to brave bad weather, dangerously sized waves, and even sharks, for the perfect ride. But, it seems another danger of surfing has been lying in plain sight all along: ocean waters are full of drug-resistant bacteria — and surfers are most at risk. In a study published this weekend in the journal Environmental International, a team of researchers from the University of Exeter found that regular surfers and bodyboarders are four times as likely as normal beach-goers to harbor bacteria with high likelihoods of antibiotic resistance. This is because surfers typically swallow ten times more seawater during a surf session than sea swimmers. The cheekily named Beach Bums study, carried out with the help of UK charity Surfers Against Sewage compared rectal swabs from 300 participants and found that 9 percent of the surfers and bodyboarders (13 of 143) harbored drug-resistant E. coli in their systems,...
Continue reading
1

Copyright

© Courtesy INVERSE.COM

218 Hits
0 Comment

The World’s Coral Reefs in a Race Against Climate Change

1515466370
A new study published in Science confirms devastating damage endured by the world’s coral reefs in recent years due to rapid climate change and human influence. The analysis provides a health check-up of 100 coral reefs around the globe through review of records from 1980 to 2016 from government documents, scientific studies, and media reports. The result paints a grim picture.  As recently as the 1980s, reefs could expect roughly 25-30 years between bleaching episodes. Today, abnormally high water temperatures occur around every 6 years, while reefs need decades to recuperate. “It’s like getting hit by a serious disease every couple of years, or at such short intervals that you don’t have time to recover in between,” says study co-author Julia Baum, a marine biologist at the University of Victoria. Read more here Original link
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

74 Hits
0 Comment

Bermuda Hotel Launches Marine Conservation Campaign

1515780237
A Bermuda hotel is launching a project aimed at increasing awareness for protecting the island’s precious marine life. The Hamilton Princess hotel’s conservation campaign is built around an informative website that shares interesting facts about the various marine species that can be seen while diving in Bermuda. As well, it informs viewers that some of these species – such as the ecologically prized parrotfish – have become threatened or endangered in recent years. “We created this online experience to show a glimpse of what it is like to dive in Bermuda while spreading awareness around the vulnerability of some of our most beautiful marine species,” said Diarmaid O’Sullivan, the Director of Marketing at The Hamilton Princess. Of course, the best way to appreciate Bermuda’s marine environment is to dive right in. In addition to the marine life and some of clearest waters in the Caribbean, Bermuda is a hotspot for...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

69 Hits
0 Comment

Switzerland Outlaws Boiling Lobsters Alive

Image: Billy Hathorn/ Wikimedia Commons Every nonfiction fan should read Consider the Lobster , the late David Foster Wallace’s incredible essay on the morality of boiling the crustacean alive simply because it tastes nice. It appears that officials in Switzerland have at least skimmed the essay: New regulations will require food preparers to stun or mechanically destroy a lobster’s brain before immersing it in boiling water. But have they really considered the lobster? The Guardian reports: As part of a wider overhaul of Swiss animal protection laws, Bern said that as of 1 March, “the practice of plunging live lobsters into boiling water, which is common in restaurants, is no longer permitted”. There’s a longstanding question as to whether lobsters feel pain and how much pain they feel. The Lobster Institute at the University of Maine suggests that their nervous system isn’t complex enough to process pain, with only 100,000...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

57 Hits
0 Comment

Bizarre deep-sea creatures wash up on Scottish beach

fish-4
Several deep-sea fish have washed up on a beach in Scotland , sparking renewed interest in the bizarre-looking creatures. Nearly 10 different species were found by two local conservation volunteers on St Cyrus beach in Aberdeenshire . Jobrul Chamberlain, 15, and Bob Fitzpatrick took around 15 fish to the manager of the St Cyrus National Nature Reserve for identification.  Their haul included fangtooth, viperfish and deep-sea dragonfish, as well as chimaera or ghost sharks. "It's a real privilege to see these fish close up," Therese Alampo, manager of St Cyrus National Nature Reserve, told The Independent. "I think it is wonderful how so many people have shown an interest in these deep-sea creatures, and been inspired by how incredible they are." The fish, which typically dwell in the darkness beneath the ocean's surface, had been caught by a marine scientist on a research expedition in deep water off the coast of the Shetland Islands, Ms Alampo said....
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

55 Hits
0 Comment

Alaska crushes record for hottest December as Arctic sea ice hits record low

bakedalaska
In its hottest December ever recorded, Alaska was a stunning 15.7°F above the 20th century average. And the year ended with Arctic sea ice hitting an all-time record low. While the East Coast had a cool December and New Year’s week, Alaska baked.  Last Tuesday, Anchorage hit 48°F , warmer than southern cities from Atlanta and Jacksonville to Houston and New Orleans. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)  reported this week that Alaska averaged 19.4°F for the month, topping the previous record (1985) by a whopping 2.1°F. “That’s really quite astonishing,” said Rick Thoman, the National Weather Service’s climate sciences and services manager for the Alaska region. As he explained to the Anchorage Daily News , “ Usually you’re breaking those by a tenth of a degree or two-tenths of a degree.”  The Arctic as a whole was so warm in December that Arctic sea ice set a new end-of-year record...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

53 Hits
0 Comment

Rare Sharks With Bizarre Jaws Have Turned Up Off The Coast of Taiwan

viper-shark-heads_1024
A recent catch in Taiwan is making waves: five rare and rarely seen viper dogfish - a type of small, luminescent and inky black shark that lives in the Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Hawaii, Japan and Taiwan.   The catch was made by the Taiwanese Fisheries Research Institute during a survey of fish species living off the coast of Taitung, according to local news reports . The viper dogfish, Trigonognathus kabeyai, are peculiar and distinctive-looking beasties, but not likely to harm humans. They live in deep waters, seem to have a small population and range, and are so elusive that they weren't even discovered until 1986 . Since then, they've shown up a few times over the decades, usually as fishing bycatch. Because they're so rarely seen, we don't know a lot about them, but scientists have been able to glean a fair amount from their taxonomy. Fisheries...
Continue reading
0

Copyright

© Flipboard and it's respective article authors

56 Hits
0 Comment

SOCIAL

OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
5 biggest #threats to our #oceans - and what we can do about them #oceanprotection
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Marine #Etiquette ever heard of it? Here a friendly reminder Knowing how to #interact with #ocean #wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk.Knowing how to interact with ocean wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk. #THEOCEANROAMER #NOOA
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Madagascar: No more fish? We'll farm seaweed instead The changing #climate is a major pressure on communities across Madagascar #nofish #climatechange Add to the equation that coastal communities like Tampolove are experiencing changing weather patterns. "We are well into the rainy season, but have yet to receive rain," said Richard Badouraly, president of the aquaculture community in Tampolove. "Both farmers and fishers are in trouble."
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
Way to go scottie! Scotland plans to #ban #plasticstraws by end of 2019