oceanroamers

Providing management & consulting services to the marine, diving and tourism industries since 2003.
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"...The Go Blue Initiative is not just about mindless protection, writing laws and never ending complaints about governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

The Go Blue initiative is about LEARNING - DISCOVERING - PROTECTING TOGETHER, not just in words but in deeds." - THEOCEANROAMER 2017

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BLU3 GOUNA presentation with the Rotary Club Red Sea

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Environmental News

Watch Corals Move in Timelapse Video

Watch Corals Move in Timelapse Video
Corals and other "slow life" do move, though we often think of them as very nearly static. In order to see their movement, you need to change your perspective -- slow way down, photograph in timelapse, and then carefully assemble the result so that humans can understand what that motion looks like from the perspective of such a slow creature. Photographer Daniel Stoupin has done just that with his short film Slow Life, three and a half minutes of timelapse that took nine months to create. Behold, and definitely go fullscreen: Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo. What's most interesting to me is how much these creatures look like photographs of galaxies. "As above, so below," as they say. Stoupin wrote a lengthy article about this film that's well worth a read. Here's part: The most important living organisms that play the key functions in the biosphere might not...
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Revealed: report for Unesco on the Great Barrier Reef that Australia didn't want world to see

Revealed: report for Unesco on the Great Barrier Reef that Australia didn't want world to see
This description of the Great Barrier Reef, obtained by Guardian Australia, was written by experts for a Unesco report on tourism and climate change but removed after objections from the Australian government . This draft would have been subject to minor amendments after being peer-reviewed. The lead author, Adam Markham, is deputy director of climate and energy at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Significance: World’s largest coral reef system; marine biodiversity; evolutionary processes; spectacular underwater landscapes. Climate change is the primary long-term threat to the integrity and biodiversity of the world’s most extensive coral reef ecosystem. The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) was added to the world heritage list in 1981. It is one of the world’s most complex and diverse ecosystems, with at least 400 species of hard coral, 150 species of soft corals and sea fans, and more than 2,900 individual reefs and some of the most important seagrass...
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Leonardo Dicaprio and other Hollywood stars react to Donald Trump leaving climate change pact

Donald Trump announces withdrawal from Paris Climate Accord: 'We're getting out' IBT President Donald Trump has once again provoked the wrath of Hollywood's elite after announcing plans to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement to fight climate change. Speaking at a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden, Trump stated that he was fulfilling his duty to protect America by exiting the deal, which commits the US and 187 other countries to keep temperatures below 2C (3.6F) above pre-industrial times and "endeavour to limit" them even more, to 1.5C. He stated the Paris accord would undermine the US economy and put the country at a disadvantage. In a bid to soften the blow, he added that he was open to "begin negotiations to re-enter either the Paris accord or a really entirely new transaction on terms that are fair to the United States." While the commander-in-chief's controversial move...
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Time to Get Real. There Aren’t Plenty of Fish in the Sea and It’s Our Fault

Time to Get Real. There Aren’t Plenty of Fish in the Sea and It’s Our Fault
It seems that we humans, as land-dwellers, have little appreciation of our world’s vast oceans. The oceans provide us with 70 percent of the  world’s oxygen and absorb 30 percent of the greenhouse gases that we release into the atmosphere. But, despite this amazingness, we feel free to take as many fish as we want from those mysterious depths, and fill them with untold amounts of chemicals , plastic , and other trash . Fears that we are taking far too much from our oceans – without making adequate efforts to replace what has been lost – have been building for years. After WWII, the development of sonar technology began to take off and with it, so did the methods used to locate and capture large swaths of fish for consumption. The proliferance of large-scale commercial fishing operations has pushed many species of fish to the brink of extinction, with some...
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Coral reefs can be saved but change is inevitable, scientists say

Image copyright ARC Centre of Excellence Image caption Bleaching occurs when corals are stripped of colour-giving algae The world's coral reefs can be saved by addressing climate change but they will not resemble those of the past, a new study has said. Future reefs will be defined by corals able to adapt to rapidly changing ecosystems, according to a paper published in the journal Nature . In April, surveys showed two-thirds of Australia's Great Barrier Reef had been severely bleached within two years. Governments can sustain reefs with immediate action, the researchers said. Lead author Prof Terry Hughes, from James Cook University, said he was optimistic that reefs would exist into the next century. "But the reefs of the future are going to look quite different," he told the BBC. "Restoring things to what they used to be is no longer tenable. There will be a different mix of species."...
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Rare paper nautilus spotted on Hawaiian beach

Rare paper nautilus spotted on Hawaiian beach
Beachgoers in Hawaii managed to re-float a paper nautilus after it stranded in Oahu this week . Exactly what brought the animal inland is anyone's guess, but local marine biologists suspect it recovered from its misadventure.  Despite what its common name would have you believe, this creature is not actually a nautilus . In fact, paper nautiluses are only distantly related to the shelled molluscs they share a moniker with. What you're looking at is  one of the world's weirdest octopuses , an animal more formally known as an argonaut.  Few people in the world study these oceanic oddities because they tend to stay far offshore and out of sight. "I don't think that they come in close to shore very often," University of Hawaii marine biologist Megan Porter explained in an interview with local KHON2 News . "O r they're out at times when people aren't in the water. To have one wash up on shore where people can actually see it,...
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Coral reef can survive, say scientists, but fast action is needed

P rofessor Terry Hughes, lead author of the study, said reefs will be capable of regenerating themselves in the future but only if urgent action is taken to address climate change and the root causes of rising water temperatures. “The reefs of the future will be radically different from today or 30 years ago,” he said. “But, if we take the right steps immediately, we can – and must – secure a future for reefs, recognising that the possibility of restoring them to their former condition is no longer possible.” Original link Original author: Jonathan

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Hundreds of Huge Craters Discovered in the Arctic Ocean

Hundreds of Huge Craters Discovered in the Arctic Ocean
When Karin Andreassen set out for the Barents Sea, she knew she would find a lot of methane. The cold, shallow body of water just north of Norway meets Russia is home to oil and gas fields, and methane—the main component of natural gas—naturally seeps out of the seafloor here. Andreassen, a marine geologist at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, also knew from surveys in the 90s that she’d find some underwater craters. But she did not expect to find so many craters (hundreds!) and so many huge ones (half a mile wide). “They were giant,” she says, “And they were next to these huge mounds.” The mounds ended up being a clue to the craters’ origins. In a new study , Andreassen and her colleagues lay out a unified theory for how the craters and mounds formed as the Barents Sea itself changed over thousands of years. It...
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POPULAR

15 March 2017
I can just see Cousteau the father of diving turning in the grave. After the disastrous management of the Calypso by the late captain's last wife, now the last bastion of Cousteau's legacy Aqualung ha...
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23 February 2017
After the 20th shark attack off Reunion Island since 2011 occurred earlier this week, the world’s greatest surfer made a comment that “there needs to be a serious cull on Reunion and it should happen...
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23 May 2017
A Red Sea diving liveaboard had to be evacuated on Saturday, 13 May after what appeared to be a galley fire broke out. According to one of the 23 guests, who were left with few possessions between th...
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19 May 2017
PADI CEO Releases Statement on New Owners Story brought to you by DIVEMAGAZINE The Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) was sold in March this year to a private consortium known only a...
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19 May 2017
We take a look at the best diving movies of all time, from thrilling underwater epics to Hollywood blockbusters featuring incredible subaquatic scenes. The underwater realm struggles t...
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12 April 2017
March 15, 2017 at 9:19 PM Researchers have created a new model for predicting decompression sickness after deep-sea dives that not only estimates the risk, but how severe the symptoms are likely to b...
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