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"...The Go Blue Initiative is not just about mindless protection, writing laws and never ending complaints about governmental and non-governmental agencies. 

The Go Blue initiative is about LEARNING - DISCOVERING - PROTECTING TOGETHER, not just in words but in deeds." - THEOCEANROAMER 2017

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BLU3 GOUNA presentation with the Rotary Club Red Sea

Jesse Zeman: Why hunters and anglers work to protect our natural capital

British Columbians purchase approximately 280,000 freshwater angling licences, 110,000 hunting licences, and 280,000 saltwater angling licences annually. Elaine Thompson / AP In a Jan. 29 article, “Hunting culture rife within ministry”, it was inferred that the B.C. Conservation Officer Service is over-represented by hunters and that conservation officers choose their career for reasons inconsistent with protecting and conserving B.C.’s natural capital. The focus on personal, instead of policy-based issues, also attacked not only the interests and motivations of conservation officers, but those of hunters and anglers. The following response addresses what hunters and anglers do, and why. British Columbians purchase approximately 280,000 freshwater angling licences, 110,000 hunting licences, and 280,000 saltwater angling licences annually. If you haven’t tried hunting or fishing, chances are you know someone who does. In B.C., hunting and angling bring in nearly $1 billion annually to our economy. A prerequisite to being a hunter or angler is...
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Coral-killing chemical still appears in many sunscreen formulas

Oxybenzone
Coral reefs the world over are increasingly under threat. Scientists say rising sea temperatures, ocean acidification, and even a chemical commonly found in sunscreen are contributing to the decline in reef health. How are our reefs holding up? An abundance of sunshine draws vacationers to Cayman’s shores like moths to a flame, and to protect themselves from the sweltering Cayman sun. Many slather themselves with a product that could contain a chemical proven deadly to corals – oxybenzone. “If it does have oxybenzone, then it is confirmed to have an impact on the coral reef creatures, and yeah, literally it does kill them at very very low levels,” said DOE Deputy Director Tim Austin. He said research published almost a decade ago first identified oxybenzone as a coral killer. “The awareness that has come up as a result of the scientific research has sunk in to the industry, a lot of...
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Ocean acidification

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Present ocean acidity change is unprecedented in magnitude, occurring at a rate approximately ten times faster than anything experienced during the last 300 million years. This rapid timeline is jeopardising the ability of ocean systems to adapt to changes in CO2 – a process that naturally occurs over millennia. Changes in ocean pH levels will persist as long as concentrations of atmospheric CO2 continue to rise. To avoid significant harm, atmospheric concentrations of CO2 need to get back to at least the 320-350 ppm range of CO2 in the atmosphere. Compared to other similar events in Earth's history, ocean acidification, over hundreds of years, has been happening very fast. However, its recovery has been very slow due to the inherent time lags in the carbon and ocean cycles.  Ocean acidification has the potential to change marine ecosystems and impact many ocean-related benefits to society such as coastal protection or provision...
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For the U.S., a New Challenge: Keeping Poachers Out of Newly Expanded Marine Reserve in the Pacific

Gray reef sharks and red snappers swim over table coral on Kingman Reef, an area that has been protected as a national marine monument since 2009. That monument was expanded to additional waters this week. Photograph by Brian Skerry, National Geographic PUBLISHED September 25, 2014 NEW YORK—The Obama administration's creation of a vast protected area in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, announced Thursday, raises the question of how to police such a large and remote body of water. The area to be protected is enormous: three times the size of California. And the protections are extensive, including bans on commercial fishing, dumping, and mining. Enforcing the fishing ban alone will mean tracking down illegal "pirate fishing" by individual boats across nearly 490,000 square miles (1.3 million square kilometers), already a huge challenge for the U.S. Coast Guard and others patrolling the waters. The U.S. is "committed to protecting more...
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To Save the Whales, You Must First Save the Sardines

Menhaden are one of the most important fish you've probably never heard of. They are a keystone species, a vital link in the ocean's food chain. Four years ago, they were in serious trouble. Overfishing and pollution in the Atlantic Ocean had caused the menhaden population to collapse to its lowest level in 40 years, an alarming fact that reverberated across the entire food chain. Menhaden are small fish, about 6 to 8 inches in length. They consume algae and serve as a rich, oily food source for bigger fish, including bluefish, striped bass, flounder, swordfish, tuna and whales. The ongoing population decline meant these large predator fish and sea mammals, along with birds that also feast on menhaden, were in trouble, too. Earthjustice attorneys worked with a coalition of recreational-fishing and ocean-conservation groups and others to help convince the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission that action needed to be...
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UN developing treaty for conservation of ocean marine life

Edith M. Lederer, The Associated Press Published Friday, June 19, 2015 9:06PM EDT Last Updated Friday, June 19, 2015 9:11PM EDT The UN General Assembly adopted a resolution Friday giving a green light to develop a new treaty for the conservation of marine life in the high seas. The resolution, adopted by consensus on Friday, launches the first global treaty process related to the oceans in over two decades and the first on the protection and sustainable use of animal and plant life in sea areas beyond the territorial jurisdiction of any country. It authorizes a preparatory committee to meet in 2016 and 2017 and make recommendations on provisions for a legally binding legal instrument under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea -- and the General Assembly. It says the 193-member world body will decide in 2018 on convening a formal treaty negotiating conference. The resolution follows...
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Future technology ‘cannot rescue’ mankind from climate change, say experts

Technology will not “come to the rescue” and reverse greenhouse gas emissions, experts have warned. In a new report, a group of prominent European scientists has emphasised the importance of focusing on reducing emissions in order to meet global warming targets. Technologies that remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere have been singled out as a major component in the struggle to keep the global temperature rise below the 2C decided in the Paris climate agreement . However, the new report has highlighted the shortcomings of these technologies, describing expectations placed on them as “seriously over-optimistic”. 10 photographs to show to anyone who doesn't believe in climate change “We cannot trust technology to come to the rescue,” said Professor Michael Norton, co-author of the study and environment programme director at the European Academies' Science Advisory Council (EASAC). “However the models do suggests that every tool in our toolbox may be necessary in the...
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Australia to Deploy New Research Drones

Saildrones By MarEx 2018-01-24 17:13:41 Australia's research body CSIRO will be deploying new unmanned ocean surface drones, Saildrones, for the first time in Australian waters.The cooperation with San Francisco-based ocean technology start-up Saildrone will expand CSIRO’s network of marine and climate monitoring systems around Australia, collecting more information about sea-surface temperature, salinity and ocean carbon.The Saildrones are solar and wind powered and can be at sea for up to 12 months at a time where they can be tasked to assist in science missions including conducting stock assessments, uploading data from subsurface sensors or responding to marine emergencies. They can be controlled remotely from anywhere in the world and are equipped with both automatic identification systems (AIS) and ship avoidance systems to alert and avoid other ocean users.CSIRO Research Group Leader Andreas Marouchos said the partnership would see the organization manage a fleet of three Saildrones deployed from the CSIRO...
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300 dead sharks found on roadside may be work of Mexican cartels

MEXICO CITY — Residents in western Mexico were mystified when the carcasses of 300 sharks were found dumped by a roadside in their town, which lies about 150 miles from the sea. The shark carcasses were gutted and had their fins removed. They were found in the township of Yurecuaro in Michoacan state, which has a problem with gangs and drug cartel violence. The office for environmental protection said Wednesday the thresher sharks had apparently been legally fished in the northern states of Sonora and Sinaloa and were being taken by truck to Mexico City. But it said thieves intercepted the truck, stole it and dumped the frozen shark carcasses by the roadside. Thresher sharks are not a protected species in Mexico. Original link Original author: Associated
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The simple way this Japanese town has become nearly zero-waste

At times, separating trash between paper and plastic can be time-consuming. But it's nothing compared to the recycling efforts of residents in Kamikatsu, a small village in southwestern Japan. They sort their garbage into 34 separate categories of waste, as noted in this video discovered by Fast Company. Residents sort their trash into super-specific categories, like aluminium cans, steel cans, paper cartons, and paper flyers.  In 2003, the city embarked on a rigorous zero-waste program. The city used to incinerate its trash, but eventually realised how damaging it was to the environment. Waste incinerators have been shown to emit vast quantities of greenhouse gases and toxins that can damage the food supply. It took time for residents to adjust to the tedious task of washing, sorting, and bringing their trash to the town's sorting centre. (Although the residents do sort their trash before they bring it the centre, workers there...
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SOCIAL

OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
5 biggest #threats to our #oceans - and what we can do about them #oceanprotection
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Marine #Etiquette ever heard of it? Here a friendly reminder Knowing how to #interact with #ocean #wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk.Knowing how to interact with ocean wildlife can help you make the right decisions when you encounter wildlife. Without paying attention to how you interact in the marine environment, you are running the chance of putting endangered species, federally protected species and thousands of other species' lives at risk. #THEOCEANROAMER #NOOA
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
#Madagascar: No more fish? We'll farm seaweed instead The changing #climate is a major pressure on communities across Madagascar #nofish #climatechange Add to the equation that coastal communities like Tampolove are experiencing changing weather patterns. "We are well into the rainy season, but have yet to receive rain," said Richard Badouraly, president of the aquaculture community in Tampolove. "Both farmers and fishers are in trouble."
OCEANROAMERS - THEOCEANROAMER
Way to go scottie! Scotland plans to #ban #plasticstraws by end of 2019