oceanroamers

Providing management & consulting services to the marine, diving and tourism industries since 2003.

Andrea Doria claims life of British deep wreck diver

Steven Slater, a well-known face in deep wreck and technical diving circles, was exploring the deteriorating remains of the Andrea Doria, which became known as the ‘Everest of Wreck Diving’ after it sank in July 1956 following a collision with a Swedish liner Stockholm in thick fog. Lying in deep, dark and cold waters and often swept by currents, more than a dozen people have died diving on her. He was recovered from the water unconscious by the crew of the New Jersey dive charter boat Ol’ Salty II on Monday afternoon, and a US Coastguard helicopter was despatched to pick him up, but by the time it arrived they had been performing CPR for more than two hours, so they were unable to winch him aboard. The family of Slater issued a statement today: “It is with absolute sadness that we have to tell you that Steven died on Monday...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
32 Hits
0 Comment

This Canadian Lake Hides an Underwater Ghost Town

On the surface,  Lake Minnewanka in Alberta, looks like most other large bodies of water in Canada. Ringed by stands of evergreen trees and nestled near the eastern edge of what is today known as Banff National Park , the 13-mile-long lake has been a focal point within the park for years, drawing kayakers, hikers and bicyclists to its chilly, crystalline waters. But many visitors don't realize that the lake, as it appears today, is a modern addition to the natural landscape, and that the area, before it was flooded, was home to a bustling lakeside resort town that today can only be visited with scuba gear. Known as Minnewanka Landing , the summer village located at the base of the Canadian Rockies had lured city dwellers from nearby Calgary for years, most notably beginning in 1886 with the completion of the Beach House, a hotel constructed out of logs. Over the years the town grew...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
31 Hits
0 Comment

Seaweed could be scrubbing way more carbon from the atmosphere than we expected

If you’ve even eaten sushi, you know that seaweed goes great with rice and fish. But recent research suggests that seaweed is more than just a culinary partner — it could be an overlooked ally in the fight against climate change. By dying and drifting down to the deep sea, seaweeds like kelp may sequester more carbon than all other marine plants combined. That’s a big deal, because saltwater plants like mangroves and seagrasses are well-known dynamos when it comes to storing carbon. Per acre, these “blue carbon” ecosystems can take up 20 times more CO2 from the atmosphere than land-based forests. The secret to their carbon-storing success lies not in the plants, but in the rich muck they grow in. As marine plants grow and die, their leaves, roots, stems and branches wind up buried in underwater sediments. These low-oxygen sediments can store carbon for decades or longer. Credit:...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
37 Hits
0 Comment

New Antikythera shipwreck finds

By Peter B. Campbell - The Guardian The shipwreck at Antikythera, Greece, continues to reveal its secrets and surprise archaeologists. As reported last week, recent excavations on the 1st century BC shipwreck have revealed statue fragments, bronze ornamentation, and wooden remains from the ship’s hull. The finds are sensational, but the artifacts and the project have broader importance. Among the finds was the bronze arm of a statue, which may be the most significant find. When the shipwreck was first found and excavated in 1900-1901, a number of bronze and marble statues were recovered. However, the arm is the first piece that has been found recently and it might point to more intact statuary in the area. The arm is one of several limb fragments that do not have corresponding bodies. The Antikythera team hypotheses those statues could be in the vicinity of the undisturbed deposit that they excavated this...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
38 Hits
0 Comment

How long can a dive last?. The history of the WWII cargo airplane.

After the rains that sent mud, people and houses to the seashore in 1.999 in Vargas, a coastal city in Venezuela,  the chances of finding the most famous airplane sunked at more than 65 m / 215 ft were very remote ... we did not know if the old fisherman  who knew the exact referencing points survided the sliding or was willing to take us to the place where it sank and, if so, surely the thousands of cubic meters of debris carried by the rivers to the sea would had buried or destroyed the fuselage.  Several attempts to relocate the aircraft in different expeditions were unsuccessful. In 1995 a member of  "AVES" (an expedition group), Fernando Guerrero, owner of Epsilon Divers in Macuto found the old fisherman who has the amazing ability to locate from the surface an airplane that has not seen in his life... Back at the place where he remembered that the plane...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
29 Hits
0 Comment

How long a dive can last, the history of WWII cargo airplane

After the rains that sent mud, people and houses to the seashore in 1.999 in Vargas, a coastal city in Venezuela,  the chances of finding the most famous airplane sunked at more than 65 m / 215 ft were very remote ... we did not know if the old fisherman  who knew the exact referencing points survided the sliding or was willing to take us to the place where it sank and, if so, surely the thousands of cubic meters of debris carried by the rivers to the sea would had buried or destroyed the fuselage.  Several attempts to relocate the aircraft in different expeditions were unsuccessful. In 1995 a member of  "AVES" (an expedition group), Fernando Guerrero, owner of Epsilon Divers in Macuto found the old fisherman who has the amazing ability to locate from the surface an airplane that has not seen in his life... Back at the place where he remembered that the plane...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
32 Hits
0 Comment

Environmentalists, scientists from the 1960s return to fight for Great Barrier Reef

Posted October 15, 2017 11:21:21   Photo: Fish and coral at Ellison Reef on Queensland's Great Barrier Reef. (Supplied: Australian Institute of Marine Science) It is half a century since marine researcher Eddie Hegerl first dived on Ellison Reef on the Great Barrier Reef off Mission Beach in north Queensland. He was a penniless 22-year-old researcher when he joined a tiny grassroots group in their battle to save the reef from certain destruction. "We were optimistic," he said. But the odds were stacked heavily against them. Although now a treasured World Heritage Area and marine park, 50 years ago the Great Barrier Reef was targeted for mining. Reef campaign begins   Photo: Eddie Hegerl (left) and John Busst (centre) campaigning in 1968 in Innisfail. (Supplied: Friends of Ninney Rise) In 1967, artist and Mission Beach resident John Busst found an ad in the local paper for an application to mine...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
26 Hits
0 Comment

The Lisbon Maru, sunken World War II ship

By Emily Kent Smith - Daily Mail The remains of a ship in which more than 820 British prisoners of war drowned at sea after being locked inside by Japanese guards is believed to have been found decades after the tragedy. Now, 75 years after one of the most shocking crimes committed during the Second World War, a debate over whether the ship’s wreckage should be recovered has been sparked by the only living British man who survived the atrocity. The Lisbon Maru had some 1,800 captured British soldiers on board when it sunk in the East China Sea in September 1942 after being hit by an American torpedo. As the 7,000 ton boat started to take on water, Japanese guards battened down the hatches with planks and tarpaulin to try and drown those stranded aboard and leaving many unable to escape. Of those who made it off the ship,...
Continue reading

Copyright

© INDEPTH - THEDIVEPROFESSIONAL

Rate this blog entry:
0
47 Hits
0 Comment

POPULAR

15 March 2017
I can just see Cousteau the father of diving turning in the grave. After the disastrous management of the Calypso by the late captain's last wife, now the last bastion of Cousteau's legacy Aqualung ha...
10546 Hits
23 February 2017
After the 20th shark attack off Reunion Island since 2011 occurred earlier this week, the world’s greatest surfer made a comment that “there needs to be a serious cull on Reunion and it should happen...
5802 Hits
23 May 2017
A Red Sea diving liveaboard had to be evacuated on Saturday, 13 May after what appeared to be a galley fire broke out. According to one of the 23 guests, who were left with few possessions between th...
3123 Hits
19 May 2017
PADI CEO Releases Statement on New Owners Story brought to you by DIVEMAGAZINE The Professional Association of Dive Instructors (PADI) was sold in March this year to a private consortium known only a...
2344 Hits
19 May 2017
We take a look at the best diving movies of all time, from thrilling underwater epics to Hollywood blockbusters featuring incredible subaquatic scenes. The underwater realm struggles t...
2094 Hits
12 April 2017
March 15, 2017 at 9:19 PM Researchers have created a new model for predicting decompression sickness after deep-sea dives that not only estimates the risk, but how severe the symptoms are likely to b...
1810 Hits