oceanroamers

Providing management & consulting services to the marine, diving and tourism industries since 2003.

Pilot Takes Amazing Photos From His Cockpit, And They Will Take Your Breath Away

Being a pilot, you get to see a bunch of beautiful sights from above. Being a pilot for a South American airline, you also get to witness the stunning phenomena of storms as your job requires flying over regions that experience them. Show Full Text Meet Santiago Borja Lopez - a Quito, Ecuador-based pilot who works for Ecuador Airlines. Whenever the pilot is off-duty, he pulls out his camera to capture the magnificent sights he witnesses in air. From incredible storms to even lightning bolts - the photos he captures are truly magnificent. Keep on scrolling to take a look and follow Santiago's journey on Instagram . You can read more about one of Santiago's shots in our previous article . More info: santiagoborja.com | Instagram Original link

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4.4 billion years ago almost everything on Earth was under water, with just a few barren islands

Google Earth It might seem unlikely, but tiny grains of minerals can help tell the story of early Earth. And researchers studying those grains say that 4.4 billion years ago, Earth was a barren, mountainless place, and almost everything was under water. Only a handful of islands poked above the surface. Scientists at the Australian National University are behind this study, led by researcher Dr. Antony Burnham. The mineral grains in the study are the oldest rocks ever found. They’re 4.4 billion year old zircon mineral grains from the Jack Hills of Western Australia, where they were preserved in sandstone formations. 4.4 billion years ago, the Earth was in what is called the ‘Hadean Eon’ . This time period is poorly understood, because there is no rock record dating from that time. This is where the zircon mineral grains come in. “The history of the Earth is like a book...
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The most awesome images on the Internet

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Scientists May Have Just Revealed Evidence of the Multiverse

There are many things about the universe that still baffle scientists, and one of those anomalies is the so-called “Cold Spot” that spans 1.8 billion light years across the galaxy.  It’s only about 0.00015 degrees Celsius cooler than its surroundings, but that’s enough for it to be detected by measuring the background radiation throughout the universe. Astronomers were previously under the impression that the reason this area was cooler was simply because it contained less matter than in most other sections. It was then labeled as a massive supervoid that was estimated to contain around 10,000 galaxies within it. However, since then astronomers have discovered that this supervoid can’t actually exist. Now their reasoning is that the galaxies located in the cold spot are simply clustered around smaller voids that populate the cold spot. However, that still doesn’t explain the difference in temperature that was observed. Credit: The Royal Astronomical...
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Where oil rigs go to die

I t was night, stormy, and the oil rig Transocean Winner was somewhere in the North Atlantic on 7 August 2016 when her tow-line broke. No crew members were on board. The rig was being dragged by a tugboat called Forward, the tethered vessels charting a course out of Norway that was meant to take them on a month-long journey to Malta. Within the offices of Transocean Ltd, the oil-exploration company that owned the rig, such a journey might have been described with corporate seemliness as an “end-of-life voyage”; but in the saltier language heard offshore, the rig was “going for fucking razorblades” – for scrap, to be dismantled in a shipbreaking yard east of Malta. In that Atlantic storm, several thousand miles from her intended destination, Winner floated free. The 33-year-old rig had never moved with so little constraint. Winner was huge – 17,000 tonnes, like an elevated Trafalgar...
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